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Becoming A Pro Cyclist Part 1

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Becoming A Pro Cyclist Part 1

When you begin a neWhen you begin a new hobby or activity it can be daunting to think about the effort it takes to make it big in the industry. Sports are no different, possibly even more separated in the apparent skill set from beginners to superstars, those at the top of the ladder seem almost superhuman to those just starting up. Even so; everyone starts somewhere and even those who now seem godlike now were once in your position. With this in mind, it can still seem overwhelming when it comes to taking your abilities to the next level. So, here are some vital steps needed to go from amateur to pro, though the time frame on completing them all is down to you.w hobby or activity it can be daunting to think about the effort it takes to make it big in the industry. Sports are no different, possibly even more separated in the apparent skill set from beginners to superstars, those at the top of the ladder seem almost superhuman to those just starting up. Even so; everyone starts somewhere and even those who now seem godlike now were once in your position. With this in mind, it can still seem overwhelming when it comes to taking your abilities to the next level. So, here are some vital steps needed to go from amateur to pro, though the time frame on completing them all is down to you.

Get Accustomed to The Ride

As with several sports or fitness regimes people often start out optimistically, having that first bright eyed week where their small goals are attainable and simply ‘doing it’ is worthy of a pat on the back. This enthusiasm often dwindles fast though, which is why it is in your best interest to get biking into your routine as quickly as possible. Make sure you are riding several times a week at as many opportunities as possible. Once the idea of going for a ride stops being both novelty and a laborious task you can begin to put in the work needed to take you to the next level. Its going to take time to get used to your bike, seat height, your positioning, regular routes and more. What you don’t want to do is have to think about all of this while you are focusing on improving too, you want the ride to become second nature so that your effort is the only variable you are changing each time you head out. The quicker riding becomes reflex the more you will be practiced, the quicker you can up your game.

Start with The Right Bike

If you’ve been trying to burn rubber down country lanes on your Raleigh Max mountain bike and wonder why everyone else is blazing past you, there could be one easy answer. The bike makes a difference. It may seem trivial at first, as long as it has two wheels and some pedals it’s all good right? Wrong. Bikes are constructed for a purpose in mind, similar to cars, some are designed for the road others for varying terrain. Getting a decent road bike will be a big help mainly because they are designed for speed. Lighter more streamline frames mean that all the energy you put into your pedals isn’t largely going to tugging the weight of your bike, instead you’ll reach high speeds quicker with little drag. This does mean that you have to compromise on suspension, but because you are on tarmac instead of bounding down cliffs this shouldn’t be much of an issue. There are many models and variations out there but starting out you can be sure that anything is better than the rusty pile you’ve been riding for the past two decades.

Start with The Right Bike
Start with The Right Bike